ESWA ENDORSES:
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Safe Wildlife Passages:  Victory! The Colorado Senate bill to provide permanent funding for constructing additional safe wildlife crossings, CO SB22-151 Safe Crossings for Wildlife and Motorists, passed, and is now state law. ESWA continues to support providing safe road crossings for wildlife. Wildlife need to move about freely in order to survive.  Roads cause habitat fragmentation, making it harder for wildlife to access food and water, reproduce, and migrate, putting both wildlife and motorists at risk. More background on why safe wildlife passages are so important is HERE

 

30 x 30 - Protecting nature is critical to protecting wildlife and abating climate change, but natural areas are being destroyed at an alarming rate. Loss of nature is a threat to the U.S. and the world’s health and prosperity – affecting our clean air and water, and limiting our defenses against severe weather, floods, and wildfires. Recent science finds that 30% of the planet must be protected by 2030 in order to safeguard biodiversity against the threat of climate change. Visit https://wildernessworkshop.org/30-by-30/ for more information and to express your support.

Migration Routes - ESWA supports the protection of wildlife migration routes. The disruption and fragmentation of natural wildlife habitats and migration routes remain among the greatest threats to biodiversity and conservation efforts. The good news – Colorado is ahead of the game when it comes to protecting migration routes – read more here.

ESWA also advocates for: 

  • Supporting Wilderness Study Areas (WSAs)

  • Supporting the Town of Vail's adoption of a more protective Stream Corridor Protection Ordinance for Gore Creek

  • Opposing federal agencies’ increasing use of “condition-based management” to avoid site-specific NEPA review 

  • Encouraging the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) to fully restore the 1978 CEQ NEPA Regulations as the baseline for NEPA Planning

  • Opposing the Uintah Basin project that would transport 350,000 barrels per day of hot waxy heavy crude oil over Tennessee Pass or via Union Pacific’s mainline through Colorado